March 25, 2014

Judy~Your Daily Dose?

Last week after reading "Get Your Daily Dose of Fiber" on Ravelry and then reading Mere's post about decorating her tree, I dug through our old photos to find pictures of "yarnbombing" in our area.  Since I've not much in the way of stitching or knitting this week to show, here they are:



This was in downtown Seattle near Pioneer Square.



Suzanne Tidwell, a local fiber artist, beautified these abandoned stumps in Sammamish. This was the spring version.



These trees in a Kirkland park wore their "sweaters" for quite a while. I think these huge pieces were done on a knitting machine.


A yarnie side trip to Darn. Knit. Anyway. in Stillwater, MN, during a family reunion added to my yarnbombing collection.  If you Google "yarnbombing," you'll see lots of other examples from other cities.


Meanwhile, back in Washinton, this was featured in a local shopping center and then, according to Tidwell's blog, moved to a museum.





We haven't seen any more lately but probably we haven't looked carefully.  How about you? Have you seen  evidence of "yarn bombing" in your town?  Incidentally, I'm not crazy about that term, but I've also seen "yarn guerillas" which seems worse.  I'd much prefer "yarn art"!  I'll bet these projects, however they're done, made a serious dent in someone's stash!

17 comments:

Debra Spincic said...

I'm not fond of the whole idea but I did see recently that some panels that were used somewhere were really afghans that would later be given to those in need when the installation came down.

Cyra said...

As much as I love to see the yarn art in the streets, I sometimes think that the yarn, and the time used for yarn bombing, could be put to better use to help the local community or charities.
I understand that by taking yarn art out into public places raises the awareness of local fiber artists and artisans, and it tempts more people to 'have a go' at something creative.

So, I am in two minds about yarn bombing, lol.

Debra Spincic said...

Being practical, I think time, talents and materials should be for charitable uses too.

Suztats said...

I've seen photos of it, but not the 'real thing', so I can't comment on its visual impact. It seems to me a waste in a way, and rather in-yer-face. While it might tempt some to try knitting, it may also have the opposite effect.
I agree with Cy that the time, effort and yarn might be put to better use.

Judy S. said...

I agree also that the yarn could be used for different purposes, but then I suppose you could say that about any kind of art....that the folks could use their time for a better purpose? I think there were some pretty negative responses to the yarn bombing locally, but others appreciated the whimsy of it all. Is CQ art or should the time spent on it be devoted to making useful quilt? I don't think there's a right answer really. (In the one case of the abandoned stumps, I think the yarn bombing may have helped to get the city to take care of their removal..... At any rate, I believe that spot has been properly landscaped.)

Debra Spincic said...

I've had a very hard time getting back to CQ work because subconsciously, I feel my time sewing practical quilts is time better spent.
I think this is one of those unanswerable disagreements. There will always be those on both sides of the idea.

Judy S. said...

Yep, what is art?

ladyhawthorne said...

Fiber arts for charities is absolutely great but I have no problem with the yarn bombing phenomena. Art is needed as well and if just one person's spirits were lifted by the whimsy of a tree wearing a sweater then I have to say it is well worth it.
One could say that painting houses for the poor is a better use of paint than using it on a piece of framed canvas, but I think the world would suffer if all the works of framed art were not there to enjoy and feed our souls.
Just my humble opinion.

Judy S. said...

The trees in Pioneer Square area were featured in the newspaper under a headline that said, "It's so cold in Seattle that...." That made me smile on a grey and rainy day. Maybe everything has a dual function?

Suztats said...

That would make me smile, too! Of course, I'd change it to read, "it was so cold in Ontario....." Art is in the eye of the beholder, just as beauty is, too. What one person thinks is art won't appeal to everyone, and it's hard to classify, quantify, and give it a value.
If it feeds one's soul or lift one's spirit, makes another think and evaluate, or pushes one to question its message, it has value. I think sometimes I'm too practical and I need a little kick now and then to loosen up! lol

Barbara C said...

I appreciate the whimsy, though I don't see my self knitting for a tree any time soon.

Judy S. said...

Nor I! Right now I'm fighting with a bootie; looks like I'm running out of yarn with 7 rows to go.:-(

QuiltingFitzy said...

I'm also one who doesn't really understand the "yarn bomb" thang. I love to knit, and love art, etc...but I may just be too stuffy and/or wound too tight. What happens when a shop owner doesn't like it, do they cut it off and just throw it away? Doesn't it get all bird poopy, etc...doesn't it get filthy? I understand an artist wanting to get "art out there", "get noticed", etc. but it's all pretty random and nameless, right? Thankfully art comes in all sizes, shapes AND installations. Enough of it to go around to please even the stuffy, lol.

Judy S. said...

Maybe the rain keeps it clean? At least around here....LOL (The "yarn art" at the shopping center went to a museum afterwards. And I think the yarn shop uses theirs to help people locate their shop. Aren't lots of things thrown away after they've served their "purpose"? Maybe the yarn is recycled; I would guess that acryllic yarn is used for this, and it's really tough I don't really know...good question.)

Debra Spincic said...

With the price of yarn, I can't imagine anything but acrylic yarn is used. If this was all recycled yarn, I might be a little more friendly towards the idea.

Judy S. said...

I just reread my link to Suzanne Tidwell. She says, " I regularly source my materials from thrift stores and frequently recycle yarn from one project to the next, carefully unwinding and reknitting yarn in subsequent installations, until it cannot be used anymore." ;>)

Debra Spincic said...

OK, I am more impressed!