June 3, 2012

Angela~ Knotted Cretan~ Embroidery Journal

This stitch takes a bit of concentration to get it consistently right but it is an interesting look, perfect for crazy quilting, maybe not so good for making a frame, lol.  I used oatmeal colored aida cloth, brown and golden cotton thread for an antique look.  The golden thread is 3 strands of floss.
Since I have done so much sewing of clothes and other things, I chose Ebenezer Butterick and his patterns as my subject this week.  Ebenezer was born on May 29, 1826 and he was a tailor.  There were cardboard patterns available but it was a one size fits all and each person had to figure out all their own adjustments.  In 1863 his wife was cutting out a gown for their baby and made the comment that if patterns came in sizes it would be so much easier.  Voila!  Ebenezer created the first sized or graded patterns with several sizes printed like we see now.
The pattern pieces I stem stitched are very similar to the first garment I made in home ec in 7th grade, an A-line sleeveless dress.

12 comments:

Debra Spincic said...

Thank you, Mrs. Butterick! I took pattern drafting in college and it was very tedious. I read recently that now people are asking for patterns they can download and print on their own computers. Last night I was on the Butterick website and noticed they have a download button so maybe it is now available.

Great page, Angela. How about you whip up another one for my sewing journal?

ladyhawthorne said...

What? Your machine doesn't do this? I thought it could do anything!

Carol Neale-Broughton said...

Angela, this is really clever, and a must have for Debra. Knotted Cretan not bad either! Great addition to your embroidery journal. You always capture the essence of the stitch so well.

Debra Spincic said...

Well, probably, but first the operator has to get off the computer!

Connie Eyberg Originals said...

This is so darned cute! I am enjoying your journaling so much and these little pattern pieces are sweet. My first home-ec project was an apron. It totally confused me. Interesting bit of history and well stitched!

Judy S. said...

Very clever, Angela. I would never have guessed that there was a real person behind Butterick patterns! I remember when patterns were affordable and you could really save $$$ by sewing. Like Connie, our first home ec project was an apron, but can't remember what we did next. Thanks for the fun history lessons. Isn't it neat the way the knots make the cretan stitch stay in place? Good idea to use 3 threads; two didn't show the knot very well.

ladyhawthorne said...

Apparently my home ec teacher's forte was baking, we did a lot of that. I brought my sewing project home even though I was not supposed to and my Mom helped me get it right...my frustration was that the teacher had me sew all the seams BEFORE I put in the zipper which is completely backward! Thanks to Mom I got a good grade.

ladyhawthorne said...

Definitely this stitch needs the thicker thread. The ones I did in brown after the title just really do not show up.

Debra Spincic said...

You saw mine that I did on my TX Mockingbird panel and I used crewel yarn for them. Lots of these stitches need more than a few strands of DMC to be effective.

cq4fun said...

I love this one! Reminds me of home ec classes in school, too!

Cy said...

Oh, yet another great subject for our history lesson. And here we all are reminiscing about our first sewing project in school. Mine was a gym skirt. That was great planning on the teachers part because all the girls who didn't learn (or finish) the skirt had to do gym just in their knickers, so it was a good incentive to learn to sew and finish the skirt in time.
Angela, I actually like your knotted cretan as a frame. It is a very solid stitch, and well suited to a border stitch like that.

Suztats said...

Your knotted cretan stitch looks great! Thanks for that memory of our home Ec classes....my first project was a bag blouse. Don't think I ever wore it. hmmmmm