April 8, 2012

Angela: TAST Satin Stitch

April 3, 1043...Edward the Confessor was crowned King of England.  This particular image came from this cartoon:
Cartoons are what the designs for embroidery or tapestry are called.  This one was done after the fact as the image is from the Bayeux Tapestry depicting King Edward talking to Harold.  
The Bayeux Tapestry is not really a tapestry as it is not woven but embroidered.  If you have never seen it I urge you to do so.  It is fabulous.  Maybe one day I can view the actual item but for now I have a book that shows the whole thing, all 230 feet on page after page.  It tells the story of the Norman conquest of England and was created around 1070.
I used gold metallic for the crown and scepter and pearl cotton for the back-stitching.
The blue is a single thicker cotton and the russet footstool is pearl cotton.  


10 comments:

Debra Spincic said...

I was wondering how you would address the satin stitch this week. I couldn't visualize an entire satin stitched piece so this is a good alternative. Can you imagine the original source? that must be something!

Connie Eyberg Originals said...

Such a name, Edward the Confessor. Nice satin stitching and yet another good idea for your stitching.

Carol Neale-Broughton said...

Great interpretation using satin stitch and really neat stitching.

ladyhawthorne said...

Sorry for the bad photos, it was late when I finished so no sunlight.

Suztats said...

I like the history of England, and I've heard of the Bayeux Tapestry, and seen some pics of it, but I didn't know about the tapestry term cartoons. I always learn something new from your posts. The satin stitch looks good!

Cy said...

Love the satin stitch and history reminder. I studied the Bayeux Tapestry for a City & Guilds project about 20 years ago. It is a fabulous record of history of the times, and such a great inspirational source, even if some of the subject is a bit 'gruesome'.

Judy S. said...

Fun! I always look forward to your tidbits of history as well as your stitching!

cq4fun said...

What an amazing piece - yours and the one in the book! You did a terrific reproduction.

ladyhawthorne said...

About 20 years ago a lady taught me the needle painting technique she learned at the Royal School of Needlework in England, she's the one who told me about cartoons, until then I didn't know either.

jenclair said...

So cool! I'm a lover of English history and of the Bayeaux Tapestry, of course. If there is one date the kids I taught remember, it should be 1066!

Just a side note, have you read Josephine Tey's The Daughter of Time. A whole new look at Richard III. I re-read it recently and was just as impressed.